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Photos and videos from instagram posts tagged with #smithsonianfood

Images and videos tagged with #smithsonianfood

Chef José Andrés, the recipient of this year’s Julia Child Award, called the menu he created for the 5th Annual Food History Gala, “my tribute to the transatlantic spirit of Julia.” The gazpacho, which José described as, “so Spanish and so American at the same time in a magical way,” was made using a recipe from José’s wife, Patricia. The main course was braised Iberian pork cheeks, served with olive oil mashed potatoes, chanterelle mushrooms with madeira and thyme, and sweet piquillo peppers. And for dessert, José served his mother’s flan with orange supremes and whipped Catalan cream, saying it “tastes like home no matter what language you grew up speaking.” (Photos by Pixelme Studio, courtesy of the National Museum of American History)
Chef José Andrés, the recipient of this year’s Julia Child Award, called the menu he created for the 5th Annual Food History Gala, “my tribute to the transatlantic spirit of Julia.” The gazpacho, which José described as, “so Spanish and so American at the same time in a magical way,” was made using a recipe from José’s wife, Patricia. The main course was braised Iberian pork cheeks, served with olive oil mashed potatoes, chanterelle mushrooms with madeira and thyme, and sweet piquillo peppers. And for dessert, José served his mother’s flan with orange supremes and whipped Catalan cream, saying it “tastes like home no matter what language you grew up speaking.” (Photos by Pixelme Studio, courtesy of the National Museum of American History)
Huge thanks to the National Museum of American History for hosting the #SmithsonianFood History Gala, where the Julia Child Award is presented each year. The Foundation is grateful to work with everyone on “Team Julia,” including Anthea M. Hartig, the Elizabeth MacMillan Director, National Museum of American History, shown here with this year’s Julia Child Award recipient, José Andrés. (Photos by Jaclyn Nash, courtesy of the National Museum of American History)
Huge thanks to the National Museum of American History for hosting the #SmithsonianFood History Gala, where the Julia Child Award is presented each year. The Foundation is grateful to work with everyone on “Team Julia,” including Anthea M. Hartig, the Elizabeth MacMillan Director, National Museum of American History, shown here with this year’s Julia Child Award recipient, José Andrés. (Photos by Jaclyn Nash, courtesy of the National Museum of American History)
#blackfriday #extravaganza πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯
CorningWare’s Pyroceram was originally developed for military applications during World War II, but proved effective for bakeware after the war. This glass-ceramic, non-porous material was capable of withstanding sudden temperature changes and was resistant to stains and odors. The same dish could be used for cooking, freezing, and serving food. 🍡 
This casserole dish was donated to the museum by Mrs. Anne L. Bernat, who received a set of CorningWare dishes as a wedding present in 1967. At the time of the donation in 2011, she was still using them. 
#SmithsonianFood #FoodHistory #Corningware #Thanksgiving #VintageKitchen #VintageDish #MilitaryHistory
#blackfriday #extravaganza πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯ CorningWare’s Pyroceram was originally developed for military applications during World War II, but proved effective for bakeware after the war. This glass-ceramic, non-porous material was capable of withstanding sudden temperature changes and was resistant to stains and odors. The same dish could be used for cooking, freezing, and serving food. 🍡 This casserole dish was donated to the museum by Mrs. Anne L. Bernat, who received a set of CorningWare dishes as a wedding present in 1967. At the time of the donation in 2011, she was still using them. #SmithsonianFood #FoodHistory #Corningware #Thanksgiving #VintageKitchen #VintageDish #MilitaryHistory
Repost from @amhistorymuseum - “Planning to pack your Thanksgiving leftovers in Tupperware? If you do, you’ll be packing them in a piece of American history. πŸ₯£ 
Earl Tupper invented Tupperware in the late 1940s, transforming a waste product of the oil refining process into flexible, translucent plastic containers with an airtight seal to keep leftovers fresh. But how could he get Americans to trust—and buy—his invention?πŸ€” Brownie Wise had the answer: parties. Wise didn’t create the home party sales model, but she pioneered it for Tupperware. Tupperware parties transformed the company’s reputation … and helped drive sales. The parties did more than sell the plastic containers—they offered women (and men) an opportunity to start their own businesses.πŸ’Ό To learn more, click the link in our bio.”
Repost from @amhistorymuseum - “Planning to pack your Thanksgiving leftovers in Tupperware? If you do, you’ll be packing them in a piece of American history. πŸ₯£ Earl Tupper invented Tupperware in the late 1940s, transforming a waste product of the oil refining process into flexible, translucent plastic containers with an airtight seal to keep leftovers fresh. But how could he get Americans to trust—and buy—his invention?πŸ€” Brownie Wise had the answer: parties. Wise didn’t create the home party sales model, but she pioneered it for Tupperware. Tupperware parties transformed the company’s reputation … and helped drive sales. The parties did more than sell the plastic containers—they offered women (and men) an opportunity to start their own businesses.πŸ’Ό To learn more, click the link in our bio.”
Planning to pack your Thanksgiving leftovers in Tupperware? If you do, you’ll be packing them in a piece of American history. πŸ₯£ 
Earl Tupper invented Tupperware in the late 1940s, transforming a waste product of the oil refining process into flexible, translucent plastic containers with an airtight seal to keep leftovers fresh. But how could he get Americans to trust—and buy—his invention?πŸ€” Brownie Wise had the answer: parties. Wise didn’t create the home party sales model, but she pioneered it for Tupperware. Tupperware parties transformed the company’s reputation … and helped drive sales. The parties did more than sell the plastic containers—they offered women (and men) an opportunity to start their own businesses.πŸ’Ό To learn more, click the link in our bio. 
#Tupperware #TupperwareParty #FoodHistory #BusinessHistory #WomensHistory #AmericanHistory #SmithsonianFood #VintageHome #ObjectProject #Thanksgiving 
#BecauseOfHerStory
Planning to pack your Thanksgiving leftovers in Tupperware? If you do, you’ll be packing them in a piece of American history. πŸ₯£ Earl Tupper invented Tupperware in the late 1940s, transforming a waste product of the oil refining process into flexible, translucent plastic containers with an airtight seal to keep leftovers fresh. But how could he get Americans to trust—and buy—his invention?πŸ€” Brownie Wise had the answer: parties. Wise didn’t create the home party sales model, but she pioneered it for Tupperware. Tupperware parties transformed the company’s reputation … and helped drive sales. The parties did more than sell the plastic containers—they offered women (and men) an opportunity to start their own businesses.πŸ’Ό To learn more, click the link in our bio. #Tupperware #TupperwareParty #FoodHistory #BusinessHistory #WomensHistory #AmericanHistory #SmithsonianFood #VintageHome #ObjectProject #Thanksgiving #BecauseOfHerStory
#Repost @amhistorymuseum
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Who is going to have a casserole like this on their table Thursday? πŸ‘‹ 
Did you know CorningWare’s Pyroceram was originally developed for military applications during World War II, but proved effective for bakeware after the war. This glass-ceramic, non-porous material was capable of withstanding sudden temperature changes and was resistant to stains and odors. The same dish could be used for cooking, freezing, and serving food. 🍡 
This casserole dish was donated to the museum by Mrs. Anne L. Bernat, who received a set of CorningWare dishes as a wedding present in 1967. At the time of the donation in 2011, she was still using them. 
#SmithsonianFood #FoodHistory #Corningware #Thanksgiving #VintageKitchen #VintageDish #MilitaryHistory
#Repost @amhistorymuseum ・・・ Who is going to have a casserole like this on their table Thursday? πŸ‘‹ Did you know CorningWare’s Pyroceram was originally developed for military applications during World War II, but proved effective for bakeware after the war. This glass-ceramic, non-porous material was capable of withstanding sudden temperature changes and was resistant to stains and odors. The same dish could be used for cooking, freezing, and serving food. 🍡 This casserole dish was donated to the museum by Mrs. Anne L. Bernat, who received a set of CorningWare dishes as a wedding present in 1967. At the time of the donation in 2011, she was still using them. #SmithsonianFood #FoodHistory #Corningware #Thanksgiving #VintageKitchen #VintageDish #MilitaryHistory
Who is going to have a casserole like this on their table Thursday? πŸ‘‹ 
Did you know CorningWare’s Pyroceram was originally developed for military applications during World War II, but proved effective for bakeware after the war. This glass-ceramic, non-porous material was capable of withstanding sudden temperature changes and was resistant to stains and odors. The same dish could be used for cooking, freezing, and serving food. 🍡 
This casserole dish was donated to the museum by Mrs. Anne L. Bernat, who received a set of CorningWare dishes as a wedding present in 1967. At the time of the donation in 2011, she was still using them. 
#SmithsonianFood #FoodHistory #Corningware #Thanksgiving #VintageKitchen #VintageDish #MilitaryHistory
Who is going to have a casserole like this on their table Thursday? πŸ‘‹ Did you know CorningWare’s Pyroceram was originally developed for military applications during World War II, but proved effective for bakeware after the war. This glass-ceramic, non-porous material was capable of withstanding sudden temperature changes and was resistant to stains and odors. The same dish could be used for cooking, freezing, and serving food. 🍡 This casserole dish was donated to the museum by Mrs. Anne L. Bernat, who received a set of CorningWare dishes as a wedding present in 1967. At the time of the donation in 2011, she was still using them. #SmithsonianFood #FoodHistory #Corningware #Thanksgiving #VintageKitchen #VintageDish #MilitaryHistory
Thanks to everyone who came out to meet us on the East Coast leg of our @lavashthebook tour. It was an unforgettable week, and we now have a bunch of new members of #teamlavash .
Special thanks to:
@erinjoonmtl @micheleforgione and @impastomtl in Montréal 
@wordloaf @elmendorfbaking @testkitchen and @belmontbooks in the Boston/Cambridge/Belmont Area.
@hallebutvin @fernwehandfood @smithsonianfolklife #smithsonianfood and the Armenian Embassy in Washington DC.
For more behind the scenes, check out photos from @arazada and @johnleepictures and from our book account, @lavashthebook 
Thank you, thank you!!!
(Photo credit: Ara Zada)
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#lavashthebook #betterwithlavash #teamlavash #cookbooks #cookbooksigning #books #booklaunch #booklaunchparty #merci #armenianfood #newfriends #gratitude #armenia
Thanks to everyone who came out to meet us on the East Coast leg of our @lavashthebook tour. It was an unforgettable week, and we now have a bunch of new members of #teamlavash . Special thanks to: @erinjoonmtl @micheleforgione and @impastomtl in Montréal @wordloaf @elmendorfbaking @testkitchen and @belmontbooks in the Boston/Cambridge/Belmont Area. @hallebutvin @fernwehandfood @smithsonianfolklife #smithsonianfood and the Armenian Embassy in Washington DC. For more behind the scenes, check out photos from @arazada and @johnleepictures and from our book account, @lavashthebook Thank you, thank you!!! (Photo credit: Ara Zada) . . . . . . . . #lavashthebook #betterwithlavash #teamlavash #cookbooks #cookbooksigning #books #booklaunch #booklaunchparty #merci #armenianfood #newfriends #gratitude #armenia